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Parenting

Father’s Day 2012 – Reconnecting Families and Dads Saturday, June 16th, 2012

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is encouraging Public Housing Authorities and their local partners to join across the nation to host a special event for fathers and their children on Saturday, June 16th in celebration of Father’s Day 2012.

HUD Father's Day Events 2014: Reconnecting Families and Dads

This year marks the fourth year the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is hosting its annual Father’s Day Initiative events, “Reconnecting Families and Dads,” throughout the month of June. Father’s Day events provide fun activities to support the bonding of fathers and their children, as well as connect fathers to economic development resources.

National Foster Care Month

May is National Foster Care Month, a month set aside to acknowledge foster parents, family members, volunteers, mentors, community members, child welfare professionals, and policymakers who help children and youth in foster care find permanent homes and connections.

National Child Abuse Prevention Month

Learn how you can raise awareness about child abuse and neglect and create strong communities to support children and families to help prevent child abuse during Prevention Month in April and throughout the year. Visit the 2011 National Child Abuse Prevention Month website for resources and strategies on engaging communities and supporting families. The site features:

Nation's Housing Authorities to Celebrate Fathers Day

Communities host free one-day celebration of dads

With the help of hundreds of public housing authorities across the nation, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is taking Father’s Day to a whole new level. HUD appealed to the nation’s 3,200 public housing authorities to host Father’s Day 2011 on Saturday, June 18th – a day to celebrate fatherhood, family and to support fathers in staying connected with their children.

Report on Well-Being of Nation’s Children Released

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (Forum) has released its annual report, “America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being.” This year's report continues morethan a decade of dedication and collaboration by agencies across the federal government to advance our understanding of our Nation's children and what may be needed to bring them a better tomorrow.

Strengthening Families to Prevent Teen Drug Use

Experts say one way to prevent young people from using drugs is to strengthen family relationships, so that youth develop an open and trusting relationship with parents. "Parenting Wisely," an online-based SAMHSA-model program developed by Family Works, Inc., teaches parents how to better communicate with their teenage kids and disciplinary strategies that can help gain their children's trust.

Pregnancy Prevention

Teen pregnancy prevention is a national priority. Despite declines in teen pregnancy and birth rates in the U.S., the national teen pregnancy rate continues to be higher than the rates in other Western industrialized nations.1 Racial and ethnic disparities remain, with higher rates of teen pregnancy for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adolescents than non-Hispanic white adolescents.2 Teen pregnancy prevention is a major public health issue because it directly affects the immediate and long-term well-being of mother, father, and child. Teen pregnancy and childbirth contribute significantly to dropout rates among high school females, increased health and foster care costs, and a wide range of developmental problems for children born to teen mothers. 3

Addressing teen pregnancy prevention requires broad efforts that involve families, service providers, schools, faith- and community-based organizations, recreation centers, policymakers, and youth. The development and implementation of evidence-based prevention efforts require an understanding of the problem including knowledge of target populations, trends in the rates of teen pregnancy and birth, and the risk and protective factors associated with teen pregnancy. This information can be used to inform decisions—such as choosing which risk and protective factors to focus on—in order to help better guide the effective implementation of evidence-based practices to prevent teen pregnancies. Currently there are a number of initiatives being implemented through the support of the federal government and other organizations to better address the issue of teen pregnancy.  

1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2011; Kost & Henshaw, 2012
2 Kost & Henshaw, 2012
3 CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health, 2011

USDA and the Military: Positive Youth Development

The U.S. Department of Agriculture partners with the Department of Defense’s Office of Military Community and Family Policy and the Army, Navy, and Air Force to support military-connected children and youth, and to ensure that service members are able to focus on readiness and the mission.

Children of Incarcerated Parents

Having a parent in prison can have an impact on a child’s mental health, social behavior, and educational prospects.1 The emotional trauma that may occur and the practical difficulties of a disrupted family life can be compounded by the social stigma that children may face as a result of having a parent in prison or jail.2 Children who have an incarcerated parent may experience financial hardship that results from the loss of that parent’s income.3 Further, some incarcerated parents face termination of parental rights because their children have been in the foster care system beyond the time allowed by law4 or have questions about child support. These children require support from local, state, and federal systems to serve their needs.

Children of incarcerated parents may also face a number of other challenging circumstances. They may have experienced trauma related to their parent’s arrest or experiences leading up to it.5 Children of incarcerated parents may also be more likely to have faced other adverse childhood experiences, including witnessing violence in their communities or directly in their household or exposure to drug and alcohol abuse.6

For more information and resources on these overlapping problems, please see the additional links and resources in this youth topic:

For Parents and Caregivers

For Law Enforcement and Corrections Personnel

For School Administration and Teachers

For Child Welfare/Social Work and Clinical Professionals

1 La Vigne, Davies, & Brazzell, 2008
2 La Vigne et al., 2008
3 General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 2011
4 U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), 2011
5 La Vigne et al., 2008
6 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2013; Phillips & Gleeson, 2007