Dept. of Health and Human Services

Round 1 Pilot Site Announcement

The following is cross-posted from the U.S. Department of Education's blog, published October 29, 2015. See the original blog post here.

We all share the goal of improving education, employment, and other key outcomes for youth, especially those who are disconnected from Performance Partnership Pilots for Disconnected Youthwork, school, or other social supports. Today, the Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs is pleased to join with the interagency Performance Partnership Pilots for Disconnected Youth (P3) initiative in announcing nine pilots to improve outcomes for this underserved population. These pilots give state, local, and tribal governments an opportunity to test innovative new strategies to improve such outcomes for low-income disconnected youth ages 14 to 24, including youth who are in foster care, homeless, young parents, involved in the justice system, unemployed, or who have dropped out or are at risk of dropping out of school.

The idea is simple: P3 gives communities greater flexibility to use the federal dollars they already have more effectively, and they agree to be more accountable for concrete outcomes. This first set of pilots will test flexibility with federal youth-serving funds in diverse environments across America, including urban, rural, and tribal communities. Pilot sites include:

  • Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Broward County, Florida
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Los Angeles, California
  • The State of Oklahoma
  • Seattle, Washington
  • Southeastern Kentucky, including Bell, Clay, Harlan, Knox, Leslie, Letcher, and Perry Counties
  • Ysleta del Sur Pueblo

Pilots will implement solutions that include, for example, helping low-income moms acquire the skills to become better parents while gaining valuable job experience through childcare internships, helping foster youth successfully transition from high school to college or employment, and intervening with the highest-risk youth before they drop out of high school. In the coming weeks, Federal agencies and these sites will finalize performance agreements that will support the pilot’s work and outline the outcomes these solutions will be measured against.

Led by the Department of Education, P3 brings together six federal agencies including the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Justice as well as the Corporation for National and Community Service and the Institute for Museum and Library Services to help communities address common barriers. For example, practitioners and advocates on the front lines of service delivery have let agencies know that better outcomes are hindered sometimes by programmatic and administrative obstacles, such as fragmented data systems and program stovepipes resulting in poor coordination. P3 pilots can tackle these challenges more effectively by blending together certain federal funds that they already receive from the participating agencies and by acquiring new waivers and flexibility under federal statutes, regulations, and other requirements.

The P3 model emphasizes evidence and learning, both within communities and at a national level. The P3 competition asked sites to match existing evidence of what works with community challenges identified through a needs assessment and to demonstrate how they will use reliable data to guide decision-making and be accountable for better outcomes. All nine pilots responded to the competition’s incentive to rigorously evaluate the impact of at least one component of their on-site approach. Federal agencies will also conduct a national cross-site evaluation of how pilots implement the P3 model, their strategies, challenges, and outcomes. Findings will help strengthen how agencies and the field address disconnected youth needs in the future.

The zipcode a young person is born in should never determine his or her outcomes in life. To help prepare for the second P3 competition, which will be held this winter, the Department of Education has released a Notice of Proposed Priorities on behalf of participating agencies to seek ideas from the field on strengthening this important initiative and empowering communities to think big about reconnecting youth.

>> Click here for the U.S. Department of Education's press release on this announcement.

Update: Performance Partnership Pilots (P3) Notice of Proposed Priorities

Group of YouthIt’s an exciting time for Performance Partnership Pilots for Disconnected Youth (P3)! The participating federal agencies have two major updates to share with stakeholders on this initiative in partnership with state, local, and tribal governments to improve education, employment, and other key outcomes for low-income youth who are disconnected from work, school, or other social supports.

  • We’re inviting your feedback on how to strengthen our work. On behalf of the six participating agencies, the Department of Education has released a Notice of Proposed Priorities (NPP) that lays out priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for our second round of P3 pilots as well as competitions that may be held in later years. The NPP tries to build on lessons learned in our first round of pilot selection. Because P3 is meant to support states, tribes, and localities in improving outcomes for disconnected youth, we need your input to improve the process for reviewing and selecting pilots. Please provide comments by November 23rd.
  • We’re getting close to announcing the first round of pilots. Participating agencies are currently working to finalize P3 performance agreements with nine sites. We look forward to making an official announcement and sharing more information about the pilots in the coming weeks.

» Click here to learn more about Performance Partnership Pilots for Disconnected Youth

Guide for Incarcerated Parents Who Have Children in the Child Welfare System

A new guide helps parents involved in the criminal justice system work with the child welfare system to stay involved with their children and understand the reunification process.

Children of Incarcerated Parents: Presentations

Educators are Critical Partners in Making A Difference in the Lives of Children of Incarcerated Parents

On September 24, 2015, the Federal Interagency Reentry Council (FIRC) Subcommittee on Children of Incarcerated Parents and the American Institutes for Research hosted the webinar, Educators are Critical Partners in Making A Difference in the Lives of Children of Incarcerated Parents. This presentation and Q&A session provided the audience with statistics on the prevalence of children with incarcerated parents, practical tips for addressing the needs of these children and youth, and how to use collaboration, focused assistance, and advocacy to contribute to positive outcomes for children who have an incarcerated parent. Presenters included nationally-recognized experts, educators who are currently addressing the needs of children of incarcerate parents, and a youth whose parent is incarcerated:

  • Ann Adalist-Estrin — Director, National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated
  • David Osher — Vice President and Institute Fellow, American Institutes for Research
  • Dwight Davis — Assistant Principal, Turnaround for Children Partner School
  • Kendall T. — U.S. Dream Academy Graduate
  • Download the speaker biographies (PDF, 5 pages).

Watch the webinar recording:

Download the presentation slides (PDF, 60 pages).

Download the transcript (PDF, 20 pages).

» Learn more about Children of Incarcerated Parents at youth.gov/COIP.

» Join the Children of Incarcerated Parents listserv.

Family and Community Engagement

Family engagement is defined as “a reciprocal partnership between parents and programs that reflects a shared responsibility to foster young children’s development and learning.”1 Family and community engagement comprises parents (broadly defined to refer to a child’s or youth’s primary caregiver) and youth-service providers, school staff, and community members working together to actively support and improve the academic achievement, social and behavioral development, and health of children, adolescents, and young adults. This relationship continues from birth to young adulthood and reinforces the health and academic success of youth across a myriad of settings, such as home, school, and afterschool programs and within the community.2 In other words, family and community engagement is an essential component of improving outcomes for children and youth.3 Engagement extends beyond simple involvement by "motivating and empowering families to recognize their own needs, strengths, and resources and to take an active role in working toward change."4

Although the benefits of family and community engagement are clear, the role of youth-service providers, school staff, and community members in promoting this engagement is not as clear. Parents who want the best for their children may not receive adequate information and support to understand the importance of the many roles they play (e.g. as first teachers, advocates and nurturers) in their children’s development and how best to satisfy those roles. This lack of communication with and support for parents is associated with lower levels of family engagement.5 As we work to create a culture of shared responsibility for improving outcomes for all children , family and community engagement becomes an essential component of any collective impact strategy. In that respect engaging the families in our communities requires a shared effort, with youth-service providers, school staff, and community members committing to reach out to parents in purposeful ways to help them support their children’s development.6

The family and community engagement process develops over time and involves several key determining factors:

  1. Parents must believe that they play a vital and active role in their children’s development and education and have a positive sense of self-efficacy for helping their children succeed;
  2. Parents believe that youth-serving personnel value, expect, and invite them to be engaged; and
  3. Parents’ socioeconomic situation, knowledge, skills, and time support engagement.7

Academic Statistics

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics reports:

  • In 2013, 17 percent of young adults, 18-24 years old, had not completed high school, and 83 percent had at least a high school diploma or equivalency certification.8
  • In 2012, the average literacy proficiency level among youth, 16-19 years old, in the United States who had completed high school was the lowest among all of the countries participating in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Survey of Adult Skills (270 points for U.S. youth, compared to 285 points for youth in other countries; a difference of 5.26 percent).9
  • In 2013, the percentage of young adults, 20-24 years old, who were not enrolled in school or working was highest among those who had not completed high school (45 percent).10

Resources

Center for Promise
America’s Promise Alliance supports the Center for Promise in collaboration with Tufts University's School of Arts and Sciences. The Center conducts evidence-based exploration of issues surrounding the dropout crisis and develops tools for communities to use to effectively support young people, including family engagement resources.

Family Engagement Inventory
The Family Engagement Inventory (FEI) is a free, interactive website designed to familiarize professionals in child welfare, juvenile justice, behavioral health, early childhood education, and education with family engagement, as defined and implemented across these fields of practice. The site aggregates knowledge in a way that helps professionals in multidisciplinary exploration of family engagement. FEI helps practitioners, managers, and system leaders understand the commonalities and differences in family engagement across the disciplines to support collaboration among the multiple systems that often work with the same families. FEI is a product of the Child Welfare Information Gateway, which is a service from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

GradNation: Family Engagement
America’s Promise Alliance supports the GradNation website, which provides information about key topics related to increasing high school graduation rates and opportunities for participation in local efforts. The website is an online community for stakeholders implementing dropout prevention efforts and serves as a space to share stories through text and multimedia. The Family Engagement section of the website contains tools, reports, research, and best practices for family engagement for educational support and dropout prevention.

Harvard Family Research Project: Family Involvement
The Harvard Family Research Project conducts research and evaluation projects and synthesizes the work of others to provide practical information to stimulate innovation and improvement in policy, practice, and evaluation around the well-being of children, youth, families, and their communities. The Family Engagement section of the website provides background, policy guidance, a network of family members involved in education, projects, publications, and resources on effective ways to support family involvement in children’s learning and development.

National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement (NRCOI)
NRCOI offers free, onsite training, technical assistance, research, and evaluation to help state and tribal child welfare agencies with strategic planning, improving quality, evaluating outcomes, facilitating stakeholder involvement, and improving training and workforce development. NRCOI is funded by the Children’s Bureau, Administration for Children & Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Association for Family, School, and Community Engagement (NAFSCE)
NAFSCE focuses on advancing high-impact policies and practices for families, school, and community engagement to promote child development and improve student achievement.

National Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
The National PTA offers information and support to parents to help them stay involved in the lives of their children. The website provides resources for families, school personnel, and community organizations regarding educational success and parent involvement in schools. Resources focus on such topics as literacy, school climate, special populations, physical activity, military alliances, health and safety, male engagement, special education, and urban family engagement.

National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections (NRCPFC)
NRCPFC emphasizes family-centered principles and practices and provides training, technical assistance, and information services to help state, local, tribal, and other publicly administered or supported child welfare agencies. The Center is a service of the Children’s Bureau, Office of the Administration for Children & Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and a member of the Training and Technical Assistance Network.

Parent Technical Assistance Centers (PTACs)
Six regional PTACs are funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) at the U.S. Department of Education. PTACs serve as a resource and technical assistance provider to OSEP’s funded network of Parent Centers. Parent Centers encourage families of children and young adults from birth to age 22 with all disabilities — physical, cognitive, emotional, and learning — to participate effectively in education at home.

Understanding the Roles of Parents and Caregivers in Community-Wide Bullying Prevention Efforts (PDF, 6 pages)
This resource is tailored for parents and caregivers as a guide to the StopBullying.gov training module.

You for Youth: Engaging Families and Communities Toolkit
This toolkit from the U.S. Department of Education provides lesson-planning templates, sample lessons, and resources that afterschool programs can use to build family and community engagement. The key goal is to increase student achievement, aptitude, and interest in science by involving families in the learning process and making the most of community resources.

References

1 Forry, Moodie, Rothenberg, & Simkin, 2011
2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014
3] Bryk, 2010
4 Steib, 2004<
5 Hoover-Dempsey, et al., 2005
6 Westmoreland, Rosenberg, Lopez, & Weiss, 2009
7 Hoover-Dempsey, et al., 2005
8 Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2014
9 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2013
10 Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2014

Strengthening Incarcerated Individuals and Their Families

This webinar explored innovative strategies to improve reentry success by offering programs that help strengthen family relationships as a strategic support network beginning at incarceration.

Expanding Access to Health Care Services and Work-Based Experiences for Youth with Chronic Health Conditions and Disabilities

ODEP and MCHB released a joint letter emphasizing the importance of health care transition for youth with chronic health conditions and disabilities and highlights opportunities to integrate health care transition and career planning through the Affordable Care Act and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

Tools, Guides, & Resources

This page provides a continually-updated list of tools, guides, and resources to assist teachers, school staff, youth, parents, and youth-serving organizations in caring for and supporting children who have an incarcerated parent. Stay tuned to this page for additional new resources as they become available.

For Parents and Caregivers

Guide for Incarcerated Parents Who Have Children in the Child Welfare System (PDF, 34 pages)
The purpose of this guide is to help parents involved in the criminal justice system work with the child welfare system to stay in touch with their children and stay involved in decisions about their children’s well-being. The guide also includes important information on steps required by the child welfare system for reunification, or having children return home to their family after foster care. Child welfare and social work professionals may also benefit from this guide to inform work with incarcerated parents, their children, and the caregivers.

Tip Sheet for Incarcerated Parents: Planning for a Visit from Your Child/Children
Visitation can be an important and meaningful experience for incarcerated parents and their children, but it can also be a source of stress and anxiety when parents’ or children’s expectations do not align with what ends up happening. Many aspects of visitation are outside of the control of an incarcerated parent, but there are things you can do to anticipate problems and reduce stress to make visitation a positive and beneficial experience for everyone involved. Included in the tip sheet are things to consider when planning for a visit from your child.

Sesame Street Resources
Sesame Workshop's initiative — Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration — provides much-needed bilingual (English/Spanish) multimedia tools for families with young children (ages 3-8) who have an incarcerated parent. These FREE resources include a resource kit with A Guide for Parents and Caregivers, a Children's Storybook, and a new Sesame Street video; an Incarcerated Parent Tip Sheet; and the Sesame Street: Incarceration mobile app for smart phones and tablets.

For Law Enforcement and Corrections Personnel

Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Roll Call Training Video
The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) collaborated on the creation of the Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents Roll Call Training Video based on the IACP/BJA Model Policy.

Safeguarding Children at the Time of Parental Arrest Law Enforcement Pre-Arrest/Arrest Checklist (PDF, 2 pages)
The Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs, in partnership with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, created a checklist that provides strategies to lessen the potential harmful effects of parental arrest on children and youth.

Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents: Trauma Prevention Policy (PDF, 38 pages)
The Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs, in partnership with the International Association of Chiefs of Police, created a policy that reflects input from subject-matter experts and stakeholders, providing strategies for law enforcement to improve their procedures for interactions with children when a parent is arrested.

Tip Sheet for Prison/Jail Staff and Volunteers: Supporting Children Who Have an Incarcerated Parent
Prison and jail staff and volunteers play an important role in facilitating visits and helping make visits a positive experience for children with incarcerated parents. Visits from family members can help promote strong family ties and have been shown to decrease recidivism. For children, visits are an important way to maintain the relationship with their incarcerated parent, which can have important implications on a child’s behavior and mental health. Staff and volunteers are the first and last individuals that children see in the facility; their support of family visits can set an important tone that parent-child relationships are valued and important.

Training Key 1 — Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents: An Overview (PDF, 6 pages)
Part I of this two-part Training Key® on children of arrested parents from the International Association of Chiefs of Police focuses on providing an overview of the topic, defining key terms used in the discussion, and outlining the legal obligations that govern the actions of officers when confronted with these situations.

Training Key 2 — Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents: Coordination and Response (PDF, 6 pages)
Part II of this two-part Training Key® on children of arrested parents from the International Association of Chiefs of Police focuses on recommended policies and procedures.

Video Visiting in Corrections: Benefits, Limitations, and Implementing Considerations
This guide from the National Institute of Corrections can help inform administrators working in correctional settings about the benefits and challenges of using “video visiting,” in which incarcerated individuals communicate with family members via video conferencing technology or virtual software programs. The guide includes three chapters that address: (1) reasons to consider video visiting; (2) implementation considerations; and (3) evaluation of a video visiting program.

Webinar: Collaborating with Community Partners to Safeguard Children of Arrested Parents
Webinar panelists highlighted strategies for law enforcement to collaborate with child welfare services and other community partners to ensure the best outcomes for children of arrested parents. The webinar was hosted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Webinar: Developing a Policy to Protect Children of Arrested Parents
Webinar panelists represented the San Francisco Police Department, the San Francisco Office of Citizen Complaints, the San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership, and Project WHAT! Webinar panelists provided guidance on the planning and implementation process of a police departmental policy to protect children at the time of parental arrest. Resources were provided to assist law enforcement agencies in developing and implementing relevant policies in their agency. The webinar was hosted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Webinar: Preparing to Launch: Q & A on Implementing Parental Arrest Policies to Safeguard Children
During this webinar, the Albany, New York, Chief of Police shared his experience in developing and implementing a parental arrest policy in a mid-sized police department. Attendees had the opportunity to ask panelists, representing the areas of law enforcement, child psychology, and community partners, questions regarding law enforcement agency parental arrest policies and procedures. Resources were provided to assist law enforcement agencies in developing and implementing a policy in their agency. The webinar was hosted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Webinar: Protecting Children of Arrested Parents: Using a Trauma-Informed Approach
This presentation provided an in-depth look at the traumatic effects of parental arrest on children, and provided best practice recommendations and strategies for law enforcement to prevent or mitigate trauma to children during and after the arrest of a parent. The webinar was hosted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Webinar: Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents during Investigative and Tactical Operations
Panelists discussed the potential risks to children of arrested parents during tactical and investigative operations, and provided strategies and best practice recommendations for law enforcement to mitigate these risks. Resources were provided to assist law enforcement agencies in developing and implementing a policy to safeguard children during these operations. The webinar was hosted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

For School Administration, Teachers, and Staff

NEW! Supporting Youth with Incarcerated Parents: For School Staff
This video and discussion guide are designed for school staff who provide direct supports and services to students: teachers, administrators, and support staff (e.g., school social worker, psychologist, guidance counselor, librarian, art teacher, PE teacher, cafeteria worker, custodian, bus driver). School staff contributed to the planning and content and several are featured in the video.

Tip Sheet for Teachers (Pre-K through 12): Supporting Children Who Have an Incarcerated Parent
School staff make a difference in the lives of all children, including children of incarcerated parents. For the child with a parent in prison, a safe and supportive school can provide a caring, stable setting offering opportunities for educational, social, and emotional development. The bonds and relationships fostered at school with peers and trusted adults play a vital role in the child’s short and long term learning and maturation. This tip sheet describes five things to know about children who have an incarcerated parent and how teachers can contribute to positive outcomes for children who have an incarcerated parent.

Webinar: Educators are Critical Partners in Making A Difference in the Lives of Children of Incarcerated Parents
On September 24, 2015, the Federal Interagency Reentry Council (FIRC) Subcommittee on Children of Incarcerated Parents and the American Institutes for Research hosted the webinar, Educators are Critical Partners in Making A Difference in the Lives of Children of Incarcerated Parents. This presentation and Q&A session provided the audience with statistics on the prevalence of children with incarcerated parents, practical tips for addressing the needs of these children and youth, and how to use collaboration, focused assistance, and advocacy to contribute to positive outcomes for children who have an incarcerated parent. Presenters included nationally-recognized experts, educators who are currently addressing the needs of children of incarcerated parents, and a youth whose parent is incarcerated.

For Child Welfare/Social Work and Clinical Professionals

NEW! Supporting Youth with Incarcerated Parents: For Social Workers
This video and discussion guide are designed for social workers who may come in contact with children of incarcerated parents. They are intended for the larger world of social work, including those who work in clinical settings, community and faith based organizations, schools, child welfare, juvenile justice, adult corrections, etc. Professional social workers contributed to the planning and content and several are featured in the video.

Child Welfare Practice With Families Affected by Parental Incarceration
This Bulletin for Professionals provides an overview of the intersection of child welfare and parental incarceration; highlights practices to facilitate parent-child visits during incarceration, include parents in case planning, and work toward reunification; and points to resources to help caseworkers in their practice with these children and families. The bulletin is available in HTML and PDF on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website.

The Adoption and Safe Families Act: Barriers to Reunification between Children and Incarcerated Parents
This information packet, developed by the National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections and featured on the Children's Bureau website, addresses how certain provisions of the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) create barriers to reunification for incarcerated mothers. The packet also includes information about amendments that some states have made to ASFA to address these issues, best practice tips for working with children of incarcerated parents, and other related resources.

The Antisocial Behavior of the Adolescent Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Developmental Perspective
The Antisocial Behavior of the Adolescent Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Developmental Perspective, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, discusses the link between parent incarceration and antisocial behavior in adolescents, how it develops overtime, why this issue is important to address, and how to address it.

A Toolkit for Working With Children of Incarcerated Parents
Created jointly by the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) within the State of Washington Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Health and Recovery Services Administration and DSHS' Office of Planning, Performance and Accountability, and featured on the Children's Bureau website, this web-based training toolkit provides practitioners with the skills required to respond to the needs of children of parents who are in prison or have an incarceration history.

When a Parent is Incarcerated
Developed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and featured on the Children's Bureau's website, this guide provides information to public child welfare agencies and caseworkers on working with incarcerated parents and their children. Goals of the primer include familiarizing child welfare professionals with the impact of incarceration and providing information to child welfare and correctional systems to help improve permanency outcomes for children.

For Multiple Audiences

Children in Foster Care with Parents in Federal Prison: A Toolkit for Child Welfare Agencies, Federal Prisons, and Residential Reentry Centers (PDF, 29 pages)
The purpose of this toolkit is to help facilitate communication and cooperation between child welfare agencies and federal prisons so that parents can stay engaged in their children's lives.

Children of Incarcerated Parents – Fact Sheet (PDF, 4 pages)
An interagency group that includes the Departments of Justice, Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, Education, and Agriculture as well as the Social Security Administration has partnered with stakeholders both inside and outside of government to identify opportunities to support these children and their caregivers. This fact sheet describes the efforts of the interagency group.

Children of Incarcerated Parents Framing Paper (PDF, 8 pages)
The purpose of this paper is to raise public awareness, and the awareness of service providers about these unique challenges and provide strategies to individuals who interface with this population, including parents, teachers, and social service providers on how to enhance these children's social and emotional well-being.

Children of Incarcerated Parents Myth Busters (PDF, 6 pages)
The Reentry Myth Buster/Children of Incarcerated Parents Series is a series of fact sheets intended to clarify federal policies that affect formerly incarcerated individuals and their families. This series is designed to help these children, their caregivers, and the service providers who work with them.

Effects of Parental Incarceration on Young Children
As part of their project, From Prison to Home: The Effects of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families and Communities, The Department of Health and Human Services funded a comprehensive brief, Effects of Parental Incarceration on Young Children that addresses the reactions of chldren with incarcerated parents, as well as: ways of modifying those effects, programs that can help both the parent and the child, how to adopt a whole family approach and why this discussion should inform research and policy issues.

Infographic: Children of Incarcerated Parents — The Impact of Incarceration (PDF, 2 pages)
Seven percent of all children under the age of 18 – that’s more than 5 million children — have lived with a parent who went to jail or prison. Learn more about children of incarcerated parents and the financial impact of incarceration on families.

Mentoring for Children of Incarcerated Parents
This review developed by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s National Mentoring Resource Center examines research on mentoring for children of incarcerated parents and includes insights and recommendations for practice based on currently available knowledge.

Parental Incarceration and Child Wellbeing: An Annotated Bibliography (PDF, 17 pages)
This annotated bibliography focuses on quantitative research on the consequences of paternal and maternal incarceration for children that (1) attempts to control for selection using standard statistical techniques, (2) uses broadly representative data, and (3) differentiates consequences of paternal incarceration from consequences of maternal incarceration. Although this bibliography focuses primarily on research in the United States, a small number of studies using data from European countries are also included (and many additional studies in that vein are also included in the further readings section so that interested readers will be able to read more in this area).

Promising Practices Toolkit: Working with Drug Endangered Children and Their Families (PDF, 27 pages)
This toolkit, developed by the Department of Justice's Federal Interagency Task Force on Drug Endangered Children, aims to help professionals serving drug-endangered children by identifying promising practices in the field, as well as why these practice works and resources to assist in their implementation.

Tip Sheet for Mentors: Supporting Children Who Have an Incarcerated Parent
Mentors can play an important role in addressing the needs of children of incarcerated parents. Mentors are caring adults who work with youth as positive role models in a formal or informal way, offering consistent guidance and support. Youth connect with mentors through youth-serving organizations, including community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, businesses, and after-school programs. Mentors can help improve outcomes for the children of incarcerated parents by using research-based practices and effective supports.

Tips for Parents, Teachers, and Other Caregivers for Talking with Children Who Have Experienced Traumatic Events (PDF, 33 pages)
This presentation, developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, discusses typical responses that children and youth of specific ages may display after experiencing a traumatic event, as well as how parents, caregivers, and teachers can support recovery for young people of all ages.

Tip Sheet for Providers: Supporting Children Who Have an Incarcerated Parent
This tip sheet was written by youth who have or have had incarcerated parents for service providers who work with them or may interact with them. The purpose is to provide practical advice for how to help the 2.7 million children and youth who have at least one incarcerated parent.

For Youth

Tip Sheet for Youth: Youth Supporting Fellow Youth Who Have an Incarcerated Parent
This tip sheet was written by youth who have or have had incarcerated parents for service providers who work with them or may interact with them. The purpose is to provide practical advice for how to help the 2.7 million children and youth who have at least one incarcerated parent.

HHS Awards Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Grants

The HHS Office of Adolescent Health announced more than $86 million in teen pregnancy prevention grants to serve youth in communities where teen birth rates remain high.

Building Financial Capability: A Planning Guide for Integrated Services

A new interactive guide from ACF helps community-based and youth-serving organizations integrate financial capability services into existing programs.