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  1. STARS (Start Taking Alcohol Risks Seriously) for Families

STARS (Start Taking Alcohol Risks Seriously) for Families

Program Goals
STARS (Start Taking Alcohol Risks Seriously) for Families is a health promotion program designed to prevent alcohol use among at-risk middle and junior high school youths. The goal is to postpone alcohol use until adulthood. The program aims to identify the various risk factors that youths are exposed to and offer them targeted information concerning underage alcohol use. It encourages participants to recognize situations and peer influences that may lead to alcohol consumption, to understand the health risks and perceived “benefits” associated with alcohol use, and to pledge to abstain from using alcohol.

Program Theory
The program is based on the Multicomponent Motivational Stages prevention model, which is theoretically steeped in the Health Belief Model, the Social Learning Theory, and the Behavioral Self-Control Theory.

Target Population
The program is designed for youths between the ages of 11 and 15, and specifically addresses problems of youth alcohol initiation in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. The program is also offered to youths attending physical exams for sports teams, as these health-related examinations blend well with program components.

Program Components
STARS for Families matches media-related, interpersonal, and environmental prevention strategies to each youth’s specific stages of alcohol initiation and readiness for change, as well as specific risk and protective factors.

The program has three phases:

  • Health Care Consultation. A nurse, health care provider, counselor, or social worker delivers a brief (20 minute) annual health consultation on how to avoid alcohol use. The intervention is designed to reach youths at specific stages of alcohol initiation and readiness for change and provides a range of prevention messages. It also assesses the risk factors that each child presents, catering subsequent components to each participant.
  • Key Facts Postcards. Key Facts postcards are mailed to parents or guardians. The cards instruct parents on how and what to communicate to their children to help them avoid alcohol. Parents can return a detachable postage-paid portion of the card to provide information about their interaction with their children and its usefulness.
  • Family Take-Home Lessons. Parents and guardians are provided with weekly take-home prevention activities they can complete with their children and return to program staff. The lessons include an alcohol avoidance contract for the child to sign and a feedback sheet to collect satisfaction and usage data from parents.
Intervention ID
315
Ages

10 to 13

Rating
No Effects
Outcomes

Study 1
Rates of Alcohol Use
Werch and colleagues (1998) found no significant differences between the STARS (Start Taking Alcohol Risks Seriously) for Families intervention and control groups in their alcohol use at posttest or at the 1-year follow-up. Additionally, no statistically significant differences were found in rates of heavy alcohol use between both groups at all post-baseline measurements.

Frequency of Alcohol Use
There were no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control groups at any follow-up points in terms of frequency of alcohol use. A subanalysis of only current drinkers found that intervention group drinkers used alcohol significantly less frequently than control group drinkers at the posttest. This finding, however, was not observed at the 1-year follow-up.

Study 2
Rates of Alcohol Use
Werch and colleagues (2003) found no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their alcohol use at the 1-year follow-up. Additionally, no statistically significant differences were found in rates of heavy alcohol use in either intervention or control group.

Frequency of Alcohol Use
There were no statistically significant differences between the intervention and control groups at the 1-year follow-up in terms of frequency of use.

Intentions, Risk, and Motivation
The authors found inconsistent evidence of programmatic effects in terms of alcohol intentions, with a significant effect in the neighborhood school intervention group exhibiting lower alcohol intentions than their control group. However, this result was not found in the magnet school intervention group. Conversely, total alcohol risks were found to be significantly lower in the magnet school intervention group at the 1-year follow-up, a finding not observed in the neighborhood school intervention group. Similarly, only the magnet school intervention group had significantly higher motivation compared to its respective control group at the 1-year follow-up. This finding was not observed in the neighborhood school intervention group.

Peer Prevalence, Influenceability, and Beliefs
The study found no significant differences between treatment and control groups at the 1-year follow-up in terms of either influenceability, peer prevalence of alcohol use, or expectancy beliefs.

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