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  1. Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE)

Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE)

Program Goals
Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE) is a violence prevention program for African American male adolescents. Created as a response to the growing, disproportionate rate of violence among African American male adolescents, SAGE seeks to decrease violence among this at-risk population through a multifaceted community-based approach.

SAGE, which was developed and implemented in Durham, N.C., by three Durham-based organizations, is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Program Components
In an effort to combat the disproportionate rates of African American male adolescent involvement in violence, the SAGE program combined three approaches to violence prevention: (1) an Afrocentric guidance and instructional approach, which also included a mentoring aspect; (2) a job training and placement approach, which took place during the summer months; and (3) an after-school entrepreneurial training approach. SAGE was the first program of its kind to combine these three different approaches in a single program. In combining these three approaches, the SAGE program consisted of three programmatic components, each occurring in respective succession: the Rites of Passages (ROP) program, the summer jobs training and placement (JTP) program, and an entrepreneurial experience program, based upon the Junior Achievement (JA) model.

The ROP program component was based on the ROP Curriculum created by the Durham Business and Professional Chain in 1993. The overarching goal of this program component was to instill a strong sense of African American cultural pride, ethnic identity, and responsibility to family, peers, and community. Through biweekly seminars over an 8-month period, the ROP sought to encourage positive attitudes, self-esteem, and eliminate participants’ involvement in risky behaviors. Each seminar included both didactic and interactional methods, focusing on conflict resolution, African American history, male sexuality, and manhood training. Participants also met with a mentor throughout the program. The program concluded with an overnight camping trip attended by both participants and mentors. The camping trip included a private right of initiation into manhood and a graduation ceremony where the youths’ family and the larger community attended.

The summer JTP program began with a brief initiation for youth participants and individuals from the organizations where the youth would be placed for the summer. The initiation stressed the importance of appropriate behavior and punctuality. Individuals from the various placement organizations were trained on the importance of providing a structured and supervised environment for the youth, and were provided with overall suitable expectations that they should have for the youth. Youth were matched with organizations based on specified interests, and worked at their respective jobsites for 6-weeks, receiving minimum wage. The JTP program included job counselors who checked in with the jobsite on a weekly basis and, if needed, provided youth with transportation to their summer placement.

The entrepreneurial experience program, based upon the JA model, took place over a 3-month period. During this time, youth met in small groups with volunteer advisors to experience the development and implementation of a small business. Youth formed a legal corporation, developed a business plan, elected officers, sold stock, and marketed and sold a product. At the end of the 3-month period, the company was dissolved and all investors were reimbursed and received a share of the company’s profit.

Intervention ID
334
Ages

12 to 16

Rating
No Effects
Outcomes

Study 1
Flewelling and colleagues (1999) compared juveniles who received the Rights of Passages (ROP) program, the summer jobs training and placement (JTP) program, and the entrepreneurial experience program (ROP/JTP/Junior Achievement [JA]) to juveniles who received the JA-only program. They also compared juveniles who received the JTP program and the entrepreneurial experience program (JTP/JA) to juveniles who received the JA-only program.

Problem Behaviors
No significant differences were found between participants in the ROP/JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program. Likewise, no significant differences were found between participants in the JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program.

Violent Behaviors
No significant differences were found between participants in the ROP/JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program. Similarly, no significant differences were found between participants in the JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program.

Other Risky Behaviors
No significant differences were found between participants in the ROP/JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program. Likewise, no significant differences were found between participants in the JTP/JA program and participants in the JA-only program.

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