Mental Health

Strength of Us

Developed by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), this is an online community for young adults transitioning to adulthood. Youth can share their stories and advice.  Discussion topics include mental health, campus life, relationships, employment, financial matters, and social networking.

StrengthofUs.org: Live a Better Life Through Community

StrengthofUs.org is an online resource center and social networking website for young adults (ages 18-30) living with mental health conditions. It exists to empower young adults to live out their dreams and goals through peer support and resource sharing.     Developed by young adults, StrengthofUs.org allows users to connect with their peers and share stories, creativity and resources by writing and responding to blog entries, engaging in discussion groups, posting updates and sharing videos, photos and news.

Transition to College

This is a Center-developed Clearinghouse of resources, research, and articles about transitioning into college. 

The Transition to Adulthood: How States Can Support Older Youth in Foster Care

This report highlights effective strategies and promising approaches aimed at improving outcomes for youth as they age out of the foster care system. The report, published by the National Governor's Association Center for Best Practices, touches briefly on comparative outcomes for foster youth and youth in the general population, possible reasons for the differing outcomes, and state strategies to improve prospects for youth in the transition to adulthood.

Special Needs Resource Directory

The Special Needs Resource Directory, created by the Center for Infants and Children with Special Needs at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is a comprehensive accumulation of resources for families of CYSHCN.  Parents, caregivers and health care providers can find local, regional and national web site links to:        * Locate information on specific disabilities      * Identify strategies to help you advocate for your child      * Develop community connections for ongoing support      * Overcome barriers to access health care resources  

Starting Points for Communities Developing New Transition Programs for Young People...

Based on literature, research with young people aged 16-24 and families, and evaluations completed with several transition programs for young people with mental health difficulties, we have learned that there are many challenges in developing effective transition services. Here we present a synthesis of lessons learned and advice gained from young people, families, and transition service providers.

Social and Emotional Learning and Bullying Prevention

Schools using a social and emotional learning (SEL) framework can foster an overall climate of inclusion, warmth, and respect, and promote the development of core social and emotional skills among both students and staff. Because bullying prevention is entirely congruent with SEL, it can be embedded in a school's SEL framework.

Paving the way: Meeting transition needs of young people with developmental disabilities...

Paving the way: Meeting transition needs of young people with developmental disabilities and serious mental health conditions is a new report by RTC staff, Mandy Davis, Pauline Jivanjee, and Nancy Koroloff that examines best practices in services for these young people. While this population is generally underserved, the report features case studies of eight programs serving young people with dual diagnoses across the U.S. with descriptions of recommended practices.

Sexual Minority Students

Sampling of concerns facing sexual minority students and staff, including: violence, homophobia and prejudice, social and psychological issues, suicide and health, coming out. Also included are programs for supporting sexual minority students and enhancing school policy. 

School Dropout Prevention: A Public Health Role for Primary Health Care Providers

As the true dropout figures emerge across the nation, the crisis nature of the problem is apparent. Recent reports indicate that more than half a million young people drop out of high school each year, and the rate at which they drop out has remained about the same for the last 30 years (Dynarski, et al., 2008). The data confirm that in far too many school districts a majority of students do not have sufficient supports to enable them to succeed at school and will not graduate.