Safety

Sharing Ideas and Resources to Keep Our Schools Safe!

This report examines new tools to gauge and prevent potential school crises and new uses for familiar technologies in school settings. It also highlights successful safety programs in urban and rural schools. Learn more (PDF, 82 pages).  

Federal Government Releases Annual Statistical Report on the Well-Being of the Children and Youth

The adolescent birth rate declined for the second consecutive year, adolescent injury deaths declined, and fewer 12th graders binge drank, according to the federal government's annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation's children and youth.

However, a higher proportion of 8th graders used illicit drugs, more children were likely to live in poverty, and fewer children were likely to live with at least one parent working year round, full time, according to the report, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2011.

National Teen Driver Safety Week: 5 to Drive

Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killers of teens in America. That's why local and State highway safety and law enforcement organizations are teaming up with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) to launch a new National Teen Driver Safety Week campaign called “5 to Drive."

Online Safety for Youth: Working to Counter Online Radicalization to Violence in the United States

On February 5, the White House released a policy statement to counter violent extremist use of the Internet to recruit and radicalize to violence in the United States. The original statement can be seen on The White House Blog and the full text is shown here:

Report on Well-Being of Nation’s Children Released

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (Forum) has released its annual report, “America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being.” This year's report continues morethan a decade of dedication and collaboration by agencies across the federal government to advance our understanding of our Nation's children and what may be needed to bring them a better tomorrow.

Safe Routes to School (SRTS)

Multiple Federal agencies are working to ensure that when children travel to and from school this year, they do so in a way that is safe and healthy. The Department of Transportation (DOT) operates the Safe Routes to School Program, which helps make walking and biking to school safe and appealing for children and youth. Safe Routes to School is well-aligned with several other Federal initiatives, such as the First Lady’s Let’s Move!

Gang Involvement Prevention

Preventing youth involvement in gangs is an important issue. Compared to non-gang members, gang members commit a disproportionate amount of violent crimes and offenses across the country. Gangs and gang involvement result in short- and long-term negative outcomes for gang-involved youth, their friends and families, and the surrounding communities.1 Gangs are typically defined as groups having the following characteristics:

  • Formal organizational structure
  • Identifiable leadership
  • Identified territory
  • Recurrent interaction
  • Involvement in serious or violent behavior2

In an effort to replace older adult gang members who are incarcerated, gangs often try to recruit youth.3 Youth often succumb to these efforts at early ages because of their vulnerability and susceptibility to recruitment tactics.4  As a result, it is necessary to begin prevention efforts at a young age, identify risk and protective factors for gang involvement, and utilize a comprehensive approach that involves multiple sectors and disciplines working together (e.g., justice, education, labor, social services, public health and safety, businesses, philanthropic organizations, faith-based organizations, and other youth, family, and community-serving groups).5

1 Howell, 1998
2 Howell, 1994
3 Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), 2011
4 FBI, 2011
5 National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, 2011