Plan A

Developers

Sentient Research

Program Summary

Plan A is intended to reduce unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among Black and Latina women ages 18 to 19. The program includes a 23-minute video and an optional handout that provides more resources. The video includes three stories about three young women as they navigate testing and treatment for STIs, condom use, birth control options, and emergency contraception.

There are two version of the video, one featuring intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants only, and another with the full range of birth control methods. The video is distributed on a DVD, a USB drive, or a video link that can be emailed or texted to participants. Participants will need either a DVD player and monitor, a computer, or personal electronic device such as a smartphone or tablet, to view the Plan A video.

Intended Population

Plan A is designed for adolescent Black and Latina women ages 18 to 19. The program was evaluated with sexually active young women between the ages of 18 to 19.

Program Setting

Plan A can be implemented in many settings—in clinics for patients to watch before or during their appointments (for example, in a waiting room or exam room) or via a video link sent to patients to watch before they come to the clinic. It can also be implemented by community-based organizations, universities, and high schools. The program was evaluated in health clinics.

Contact and Availability Information

For curriculum, materials, and pricing information, please contact:
Aaron Plant at: aaron@sentientresearch.net, or visit the Plan A website: https://www.myplana.org/contact/

For training and support, please contact:
Aaron Plant at aaron@sentientresearch.net.

Sample of Curriculum Available for Review Prior to Purchase
Yes
Languages Available
English, Spanish
Monitoring and Evaluation Tools
Monitoring and evaluation tools available
Yes
Monitoring and evaluation tool usage required
No
Information about available monitoring and evaluation tools (if applicable)

Plan A provides outcome evaluation and fidelity instruments upon request. The program developer can provide assistance with using a third-party system to measure fidelity to the intervention (that is, how much of the video participants watch).

Program Core Components

Last updated in 2023

The data presented on this page reflects responses from the program’s developer or distributor to a program component checklist that asked them to report on the individual components within their TPP program. The same program component checklist was sent to the developer or distributor of every active TPP program with evidence of effectiveness. The program component table provides data on seven types of program components including content, delivery mechanism, dosage, staffing, format, environment, and intended population characteristics; whether the component was present or optional in the program; whether the component is considered to be core to the program; and the lesson number or activity where the component can be found in the program. For more details, refer to the FAQ.

Category Component Core Component Component present Notes Lesson number(s) / activities where present
Content School engagement No
Content Anatomy/physiology No
Content Other Yes Yes (both versions) Open communication with reproductive health providers, visiting a reproductive health clinic to obtain contraception and STI testing, condom negotiation
Content Volunteering/civic engagement No
Content Spirituality No
Content Morals/values No
Content Identity development No
Content Social support/capital No
Content Social influence/actual vs. perceived social norms No
Content Social competence No
Content Parenting skills No
Content Normative beliefs No
Content Leadership No
Content Gender roles No
Content Gender identity No
Content Cultural values No
Content Connections with trusted adults No
Content Conflict resolution/social problem solving No
Content Communication skills Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Child development No
Content Boundary setting/refusal skills No
Content Substance use cessation No
Content Substance use - Other drugs No
Content Substance use - Alcohol No
Content Substance use - Abstinence No
Content Brain development and substance use No
Content Vocational/skills training No
Content Supplemental academic services No
Content Graduating from high school No
Content College preparation No
Content Alternative schooling No
Content Self-regulation No
Content Self-esteem No
Content Self-efficacy/empowerment No
Content Resilience No
Content Sexual health Yes Yes (both versions)
Content STIs - Treatment Yes Yes (both versions)
Content STIs - Screening Yes Yes (both versions)
Content STIs - Prevention Yes Yes (both versions)
Content STIs - Information Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Sexual risk reduction Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Sexual risk discontinuation No
Content Sexual risk avoidance No
Content Personal vulnerability Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Maternal health No
Content Contraception - Condoms Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Contraception - Long-acting reversible contraceptives Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Contraception - Other Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Contraception - Pills, patches, rings, and shots Yes Yes (both versions)
Content Reproduction No
Program Objectives

The goal of Plan A is to reduce unplanned pregnancies and STIs. The program is designed to be less time intensive compared to other programs.

Program Content

Plan A is a 23-minute video based on the entertainment-education model. The video includes three stories about three young women as they navigate testing and treatment for STIs, condom use, birth control options, and emergency contraception. One story focuses on a young woman who has unprotected sex with her boyfriend while on birth control and contracts an STI. The story follows her as she navigates STI testing and treatment, and her relationship. The next story follows a young single mother who is entering a new relationship and meets with a doctor about her birth control options. She also discusses using a condom with her boyfriend. The third story follows a young woman having unprotected sex when she is not on birth control who then needs to use emergency contraception. There are two version of the video—one featuring IUDs and implants only, and another with the full range of birth control methods. Plan A also includes an optional handout that provides additional resources on birth control and STIs.

Program Methods

Plan A delivers content through a 23-minute video designed to be educational and entertaining. It can be used by an individual or in a group setting. Adolescents can view the video by DVD, USB, or a video link on their own device.

Program Structure and Timeline

Participants need to view the 23-minute Plan A video only one time to complete the program.

Staffing

No staff are required for implementation.

Staff Training

No staff training is required to implement Plan A.

Program Materials and Resources

Organizations that implement Plan A need a DVD player/TV, computer, or tablet to show the video to participants. Alternatively, organizations can send a link so participants can view the video on their own internet-connected devices (for example, smartphone or tablet). The program also includes an optional handout that provides additional resources on birth control and STIs.

Additional Needs for Implementation

A DVD player, computer, or internet-connected device is necessary to view the Plan A program.

Fidelity

Participants must view the entire 23-minute video. A third-party system can be used to remotely track how much of the video individual participants view.

Technical Assistance and Ongoing Support

The program developer, Aaron Plant, is available to provide technical support (for example, around program adaptations, implementation methods, and so on). He can be contacted at aaron@sentientresearch.net.

Allowable Adaptations

Although Plan A was evaluated in a reproductive health clinic setting, the intervention was designed to be used in a variety of settings, including group-based classroom viewing and private viewing on a participant’s smartphone, tablet, or computer. Plan A can also be used with other populations of adolescent females (for example, ages 16 and 17 or other races/ethnicities).

Adaptation Guidelines or Kit
Yes
Reviewed Studies
Citation High-Quality Randomized Trial Moderate-Quality Randomized Trial Moderate-Quality Quasi-Experiment Low Study Rating Did Not Meet Eligibility Criteria

Jenner et al. 2022

Jenner et al. 2022

Study Characteristics
Citation Setting Majority Age Group Majority Racial/Ethnic Group Gender Sample Size

Jenner et al. 2022

Jenner et al. 2022

Health clinic or medical facility 18 or 19 Hispanic or Latinx of any race Young women

1770

Study Findings

Evidence by Outcome Domain and Study

Citation Sexual Activity Number of Sexual Partners Contraceptive Use STIs or HIV Pregnancy

Jenner et al. 2022

Jenner et al. 2022

n.a. n.a. Favorable evidence Indeterminate evidence n.a.
KEY
Evidence Indication
Favorable findings
Two or more favorable impacts and no unfavorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Potentially favorable findings
At least one favorable impact and no unfavorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Indeterminate findings
Uniformly null findings
Conflicting findings
At least one favorable and at least one unfavorable impact, regardless of null findings
Potentially unfavorable findings
At least one unfavorable impact and no favorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Unfavorable findings
Two or more unfavorable impacts and no favorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Note: n.a. indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within that particular outcome domain, or the study examined outcome measures within that domain but the findings did not meet the review evidence standards.
Detailed Findings
Citation Details

Jenner et al. 2022

Jenner et al. 2022

The study evaluated Plan A using a randomized controlled trial involving Black and Latina women ages 18 or 19. The women were recruited from eight health centers in California's Central Valley and the greater Oakland area. Participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group in which participants watched the 23-minute Plan A video, or a control group in which participants watched The Toxic Life Cycle of a Cigarette, a 17-minute video about the hazards of smoking cigarettes. Surveys were administered immediately after study enrollment (baseline), and three and nine months after study enrollment.



Three months after study enrollment, the study found no statistically significant program impacts on the likelihood of getting tested for an STI in the preceding three months or on the number of times youth had sex without condoms in the preceding three months.



The study also found that nine months after study enrollment, youth who were offered the Plan A video reported having had in the past three months any type of sex (effect size = -0.09) and vaginal sex (effect size = - 0.10) without using a condom significantly fewer times than youth in the control group. Nine months after enrollment, the study did not find any statistically significant program impacts on the likelihood of getting tested for an STI in the past three months.



The study also examined program impacts on measures of current use of long-acting reversible contraception contraceptive knowledge, pregnancy risk perception, and STI risk perception. Findings for these outcomes were not considered for the review because they fell outside the scope of the review.

Notes

Some study entries may include more than one citation because each citation examines a different follow-up period from the same study sample, or because each citation examines a different set of outcome measures on the same study sample. A blank cell indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within the particular outcome domain or the findings for the outcome measures within that domain did not meet the review evidence standards.

Information on evidence of effectiveness is available only for studies that received a high or moderate rating. Read the description of the review process for more information on how these programs are identified.