Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective!

Developers
Loretta Sweet Jemmott, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., John B. Jemmott III, Ph.D., and Deborah Koniak-Griffin, R.N., Ed.D. F.A.A.N.
Program Summary

Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! aims to reduce unprotected sex among sexually active, pregnant and parenting teens by affecting knowledge, beliefs, and intentions related to condom use and sexual behaviors. It also addresses the impact of HIV/AIDS on pregnant women and their children, the prevention of disease during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and special concerns of young mothers. The program consists of eight 60-minute modules focusing on behavioral attitudes, expectations, negotiation and problem solving skills, self-efficacy, and feelings of maternal protectiveness.

Intended Population

The program is designed for pregnant and parenting teens in grades 7-12. It has been evaluated with African American and Latino youth.

Program Setting

The program was designed for and evaluated in a classroom-based setting in middle and high schools (grades 7-12).

Contact and Availability Information

Program Contact Information
Email: sales@etr.org
Phone: (800) 321-4407
Website: https://www.etr.org/ebi/programs/be-proud-be-responsible-be-protective/

Training Contact Information 
Kelly Gainor, M.Ed.
ebptraining@etr.org
Website: https://www.etr.org/ebi/programs/be-proud-be-responsible-be-protective/

Sample of Curriculum Available for Review Prior to Purchase
Yes
Languages Available
English
Monitoring and Evaluation Tools
Monitoring and evaluation tools available
Yes
Monitoring and evaluation tool usage required
No
Information about available monitoring and evaluation tools (if applicable)

ETR provides an implementation manual that includes fidelity benchmarks, a logic model, and core copmponents.

Program Core Components

Last updated in 2023

The data presented on this page reflects responses from the program’s developer or distributor to a program component checklist that asked them to report on the individual components within their TPP program. The same program component checklist was sent to the developer or distributor of every active TPP program with evidence of effectiveness. The program component table provides data on seven types of program components including content, delivery mechanism, dosage, staffing, format, environment, and intended population characteristics; whether the component was present or optional in the program; whether the component is considered to be core to the program; and the lesson number or activity where the component can be found in the program. For more details, refer to the FAQ.

Category Component Core Component Component present Notes Lesson number(s) / activities where present
Content Boundary setting/refusal skills Yes Yes (both versions) Module, 8, page 167
Content Child development No
Content Communication skills No
Content Conflict resolution/social problem solving No
Content Connections with trusted adults No
Content Cultural values Yes Yes (both versions) Module 5, page 97
Content Gender identity No
Content Gender roles Yes Yes (both versions) Module 5, page 113
Content Leadership No
Content Normative beliefs Yes Yes (both versions) Module 5, page 113
Content Parenting skills No
Content Social competence No
Content Social influence/actual vs. perceived social norms Yes Yes (both versions) Module 7, page 159
Content Social support/capital No
Content Identity development No
Content Morals/values No
Content Spirituality No
Content Volunteering/civic engagement No
Content Other No
Content Other No
Content Other No
Delivery mechanism Method: Peer-to-peer No
Delivery mechanism Method: Anonymous question box No
Delivery mechanism Method: Artistic expression No
Delivery mechanism Method: Assessment/survey No
Delivery mechanism Method: Booster session No
Delivery mechanism Method: Case management No
Delivery mechanism Method: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) No
Delivery mechanism Method: Demonstration Yes Yes (both versions) Module 7, page 149
Delivery mechanism Method: Discussion/debrief Yes Yes (both versions) Module 1, page 41
Delivery mechanism Method: Family session No
Delivery mechanism Method: Game Yes Yes (both versions) Module 3, page 70
Delivery mechanism Method: Home visiting No
Delivery mechanism Method: Homework assignment No
Delivery mechanism Method: In-session assignment Yes Yes (both versions) Module 6, page 139
Delivery mechanism Method: Introduction Yes Yes (both versions) Module 1, page 30
Delivery mechanism Method: Lecture Yes Yes (both versions) Module 2, page 55
Delivery mechanism Method: Motivational interviewing No
Delivery mechanism Method: Music No
Delivery mechanism Method: Parent-focused activity No
Delivery mechanism Method: Public service announcement No
Delivery mechanism Method: Reading
Delivery mechanism Method: Role play/Practice Yes Yes (both versions) Module 5, page 103
Delivery mechanism Method: Self-guided activity Yes Yes (both versions) Throughout
Delivery mechanism Method: Service learning No
Delivery mechanism Method: Slide show
Delivery mechanism Method: Social media No
Delivery mechanism Method: Spiral learning Yes Yes (both versions) Module 6, page 117
Delivery mechanism Method: Storytelling
Delivery mechanism Method: Text message No
Program Objectives

Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! is an adaptation of Be Proud! Be Responsible!. The program aims to reduce unprotected sex among sexually active, pregnant and parenting teens by affecting knowledge, beliefs, and intentions related to condom use and sexual behaviors (e.g. frequency of intercourse). The program also addresses the impact of HIV/AIDS on pregnant women and their children, the prevention of disease during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and special concerns of young mothers.

Program Content

Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! draws on two theoretical frameworks:

  1. Social Cognitive Theory, which states that individual learning is influenced by person factors, behavior and environmental influences; and
  2. the Theory of Reasoned Action, which is focused on individual motivation. According to this theory, what a person intends to do is a good predictor of what they will actually do.

The program covers core content through eight sessions:

  • Module 1: Introduction to HIV and AIDS and Their Relationship to Teen Motherhood
  • Module 2: Building Knowledge about HIV and Unplanned Pregnancy
  • Module 3: Understanding Vulnerability to HIV Infection and Unplanned Repeat Pregnancy
  • Module 4: Understanding Vulnerability to HIV Infection and Unplanned Repeat Pregnancy (Part 2)
  • Module 5: Attitudes and Beliefs about HIV, AIDS, and Safer Sex
  • Module 6: Attitudes and Beliefs about HIV, AIDS, and Safer Sex (Part 2)
  • Module 7: Building Condom Use Skills
  • Module 8: Building Negotiation and Refusal Skills

Through these sessions, the program provides participating teen mothers with medically accurate and factually correct information on HIV/STDs and pregnancy prevention. It also addresses behavioral attitudes/outcome expectancies, builds negotiation and problem-solving skills, builds self-efficacy and confidence in skills (e.g., positive reinforcement, support, constructive feedback) and focuses on enhancing feelings of maternal protectiveness (including educating youth about the effects of HIV on child and family and the strengths and challenges of early parenting).

Program Methods
The program relies on facilitator modeling, role playing with feedback, films, group discussions, writing (e.g. Letter to My Baby) and skill demonstrations (e.g. condom use) to deliver its content.
Program Structure and Timeline
The program consists of 8 sixty-minute modules, which can be delivered over one to eight days (see allowable adaptations). The ideal group size is 5 to 15 participants per facilitator.
Staffing

The program was evaluated with professional nurses serving as facilitators, but trained educators and social workers may implement the program. Facilitators should have experience working with pregnant/parenting teens and familiarity with the issues that affect sexual risk-taking in this population.

One facilitator is needed for groups of 5 to 15 participants to enhance quality of interactive and skill-building activities.

Developers also suggest that staff demonstrate a caring and supportive attitude, be highly participatory, and use interactive skills.

Staff Training

It is highly recommended that educators who plan to teach Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! receive research-based professional development to prepare them to effectively implement and replicate the curriculum with fidelity for the intended target group.

Training on Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! is available through ETR's Professional Learning Services. Visit http://www.etr.org/ebi/training-ta/types-of-services/training-of-educators/ for more information or submit a Training & TA Request Form (http://www.etr.org/solutions/professional-development/training-ta-request-form/).

Program Materials and Resources

The Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! kit comes with 1) Facilitator Curriculum; 2) Activity set (posters, role plays, interactive cards); and 3) six curriculum DVDs:

  • Tanisha & Shay
  • The Subject Is: HIV
  • The Subject Is: STDs
  • He Said He Loved Me
  • Baby Talk
  • Wrap It Up & Condom Use Animation

The distributor also provides access to a table of contents and sample lesson on their website: http://www.etr.org/ebi/programs/be-proud-be-responsible-be-protective/

Additional Needs for Implementation

The program requires the use of a DVD player and TV monitor.

Fidelity
Fidelity benchmarks, a logic model, and monitoring tools are available for providers to implement the program with fidelity.

Additional adaptation guidance for Be Proud! Be Responsible! Be Protective! can be found on ETR’s Program Success Center website: http://www.etr.org/ebi/programs/be-proud-be-responsible-be-protective/
Technical Assistance and Ongoing Support
ETR provides in-person and web- or phone-based technical assistance before, during and/or after program implementation. TA is tailored to the needs of the site and is designed to support quality assurance, trouble-shoot adaptation issues, and boost implementation. Contact ETR’s Professional Learning Services through the Program Support Help Desk (https://programsupport.etr.org/) or visit http://www.etr.org/ebi/training-ta/.
Allowable Adaptations
The developer notes several ways the program may be adapted:
  • The program may be implemented in a larger group setting, but participants should be divided into groups of 6 to 8 for some activities and the small groups should be brought together to share their discussions and results.
  • The program can be implemented in community settings, such as youth-serving agencies.

Agencies can structure the program sessions in the following four ways:

  • Eight days of approx. one hour per day
  • Four days of approx. two hours per day
  • Two days of approx. four hours per day
  • One day (Saturday) for approx. eight hours, plus time for serving lunch and snacks
Adaptation Guidelines or Kit
No
Reviewed Studies
Citation High-Quality Randomized Trial Moderate-Quality Randomized Trial Moderate-Quality Quasi-Experiment Low Study Rating Did Not Meet Eligibility Criteria

Koniak-Griffin, D., Lesser, J., Nyamathi, A., Uman, G., Stein, J. A., Cumberland, W. G. (2003). Project CHARM: An HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers. Family and Community Health, 26, 94-107.

Study Characteristics
Citation Setting Majority Age Group Majority Racial/Ethnic Group Gender Sample Size

Koniak-Griffin, D., Lesser, J., Nyamathi, A., Uman, G., Stein, J. A., Cumberland, W. G. (2003). Project CHARM: An HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers. Family and Community Health, 26, 94-107.

In school: High school 14 to 17 Hispanic or Latinx of any race Young women

497

Study Findings

Evidence by Outcome Domain and Study

Citation Sexual Activity Number of Sexual Partners Contraceptive Use STIs or HIV Pregnancy

Koniak-Griffin, D., Lesser, J., Nyamathi, A., Uman, G., Stein, J. A., Cumberland, W. G. (2003). Project CHARM: An HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers. Family and Community Health, 26, 94-107.

n.a. Potentially favorable evidence Indeterminate evidence n.a. n.a.
KEY
Evidence Indication
Favorable findings
Two or more favorable impacts and no unfavorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Potentially favorable findings
At least one favorable impact and no unfavorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Indeterminate findings
Uniformly null findings
Conflicting findings
At least one favorable and at least one unfavorable impact, regardless of null findings
Potentially unfavorable findings
At least one unfavorable impact and no favorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Unfavorable findings
Two or more unfavorable impacts and no favorable impacts, regardless of null findings
Note: n.a. indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within that particular outcome domain, or the study examined outcome measures within that domain but the findings did not meet the review evidence standards.
Detailed Findings
Citation Details

Koniak-Griffin, D., Lesser, J., Nyamathi, A., Uman, G., Stein, J. A., Cumberland, W. G. (2003). Project CHARM: An HIV prevention program for adolescent mothers. Family and Community Health, 26, 94-107.

The program was evaluated in a cluster randomized controlled trial involving four schools in Los Angeles County. The participating schools were randomly assigned to either a treatment group that implemented the intervention or a control group that implemented a general health promotion program, for a period of one year. Assignment status switched the following year. Study surveys were administered immediately before the intervention; immediately after the intervention ended; and three, six, and twelve months after the intervention ended.

Twelve months after the intervention, adolescents in the schools implementing the intervention reported having fewer sexual partners in the previous three months. The study found no statistically significant program impacts on the number of unprotected sexual episodes at the time of the 12-month follow-up. Program impacts at the shorter-term three and six month follow-up surveys were not statistically significant.

The study also examined program impacts on measures of AIDS knowledge, intentions to use condoms, self-efficacy, attitudes, maternal protectiveness, and social desirability. Findings for these outcomes were not considered for the review because the outcomes fell outside the scope of the review.

Notes

Some study entries may include more than one citation because each citation examines a different follow-up period from the same study sample, or because each citation examines a different set of outcome measures on the same study sample. A blank cell indicates the study did not examine any outcome measures within the particular outcome domain or the findings for the outcome measures within that domain did not meet the review evidence standards.

Information on evidence of effectiveness is available only for studies that received a high or moderate rating. Read the description of the review process for more information on how these programs are identified.