Other Youth Topics

Opportunity Youth

Five young people walking together

Opportunity youth are young people who are between the ages of 16 to 24 years old and are disconnected from school and work. This developmental time period, also referred to as emerging adulthood,[1] has great potential for individual growth through exploring independence and life opportunities. It is a critical window of opportunity for youth and young adults to gain an education and/or training that would “…provide the foundation for their occupational trajectories during the rest of their adulthood.”[2] This can include developing knowledge, skills, and character traits that are important for opportunity youth’s career pathway development.

Life circumstances, such as where someone lives or income level, can disrupt youth’s ability to explore and pursue different careers. Opportunity youth often face hardships, but they also report having feelings of responsibility for their futures, having educational and career goals, and being optimistic about achieving their goals.[3] To most effectively reach out to opportunity youth, it is important to understand who is disconnected; why they are disconnected; how to authentically engage opportunity youth as leaders; and what programming and resources are currently available to individuals, parents/guardians, and organizations that work with opportunity youth.

Resources

Maximizing Federal Funds to Support Opportunity Youth (PDF, 27 pages)
This report from the Aspen Forum for Community Solutions summarizes major federal funding streams resources that can help support opportunity youth. Additionally, the document reports on the difficulties in accessing these resources and impressions on methods to simplify the process. An executive summary (PDF, 4 pages) of the report is also available.

Opportunity Youth Playbook: A Guide to Reconnecting Boys and Young Men of Color to Education and Employment
Developed by the Opportunity Youth Network, this playbook highlights promising practices, strategies, and resources to help communities support boys and young men of color who are opportunity youth. It considers their distinct talents and needs and uplifts strategies beyond those targeted to boys and young men of color more generally.

 

[1] Arnett, 2000

[2] Mendelson, Mmari, Blum, Catalano, & Brindis, 2018, p.54S; Lewis, 2019

[3] Bridgeland & Milano, 2012